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Thread: Anyone else avoiding Boeing 737-800 MAX?

  1. #1

    Anyone else avoiding Boeing 737-800 MAX?

    The Boeing 737-800 MAX has just recently gone into airline fleets and now two of them have crashed shortly after takeoff in very similar accidents, one with Lion Air in Indonesia and one with Ethiopean Airlines. I have been reading some of the discussion on Flyer Talk. This aircraft type has new fuel efficient but overly heavy engines that had to be mounted farther forward than normal, creating balance problems that are handled by a complicated computer system. On takeoff, if the "angle of attack" sensor malfunctions, then it can tell the plane to put its nose down to regain airspeed when it is way too close to the ground to do that, and it is difficult for pilots to regain control from the automatic system in the short time before a crash becomes inevitable.

    Many airlines around the world have grounded the 737-800 MAX and the UK has announced it will not let them take off or land from their airports.

    The only US based airline with this aircraft type in its fleet is American Airlines, and they have NOT grounded theirs. Their flight attendants union has asserted that AA will have to accept their members refusal to fly this bird.

    I have a lot of ff miles left on AA, but I will NOT be using them on 737-800 MAX aircraft. The regular 737-800 does not have this problem. It is unique to the MAX variant.

  2. #2
    President Trump has grounded all of the 737MAX planes in the US.
    Jacki

  3. #3
    I hear they are calling it the nose down and hit the ground
    Timeshareforums Shirts and Mugs on sale now! http://www.cafepress.com/ts4ms

  4. #4
    We have had rough rides on regular 737's and I bet they figure out whats happening with the new 737's. I won't be getting on a new 737 until they are fixed with no problems for at least a year.

  5. #5
    The US was the last country in the world to ground the 737-800 MAX, and the president has to get in ahead of the FAA to ground them. Why was the FAA so slow to act?

    From what I read, the weight and position of the new fuel efficient engines makes the plane inherently unstable, and I am not going to trust a "software fix" for that. Fuel efficiency is all well and good, but not at the expense of safety.

  6. #6
    The US was the last country in the world to ground the 737-800 MAX, and the president has to get in ahead of the FAA to ground them. Why was the FAA so slow to act?

    From what I read, the weight and position of the new fuel efficient engines makes the plane inherently unstable, and I am not going to trust a "software fix" for that. Fuel efficiency is all well and good, but not at the expense of safety.

  7. #7
    It looks more and more like a Boeing flight control problem. Here is the latest:

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...x-penultimate/

  8. #8
    It looks more and more like a Boeing flight control problem. Here is the latest:

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...x-penultimate/

  9. #9
    Here is the latest on the Boeing 737 Max 8:

    https://hotair.com/archives/2019/03/...ng-pretty-bad/

    This is an aircraft I intend to avoid if they let it get back in the air.

  10. #10
    Here is the latest on the Boeing 737 Max 8:

    https://hotair.com/archives/2019/03/...ng-pretty-bad/

    This is an aircraft I intend to avoid if they let it get back in the air.

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