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Thread: Disney News: Disability Pass

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by BoardGirl View Post
    Unclear. You don't like that they changed the broken process or don't like new process or don't like either of them.

    I'm not at all clear on what you are dinging Disney for, as they destroyed their own program, which they can do at will. They have always been accomodating to all.
    Don't like the new policy. Many disabled people cannot spend more than a couple hours in the parks. If they have to go to guest services, wait in line there, to get a fast pass for each ride, I don't think they will get much out of their day.

  2. #12
    Super Moderator chriskre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdurette View Post
    Curious - but why would you think that a disabled person should not have to wait like the rest of the non disabled crowd?
    Its not that they don't want to wait but many don't have the strength or energy to wait.
    I can tell you as someone who has personally experienced this this past year.

    My yearly pass became uselesss to me because I just don't havethe strength to stand for 70 minutes in line per ride.
    I always bought the annual pass but this year life threw me a curve ball and for the first time in my life I actually dread going to Disney.
    its just not fun if you cant run and play.
    Disney really needs to think this one over.

    Sent from my Kindle Fire using Tapatalk 2

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Pstreet1 View Post
    You're right that there are healthy people who request wheelchair assistance, but there are also people like me who need assistance some of the time. I don't always have breathing difficulties, but sometimes I do, and if the walk to the next gate is minimal, I can manage. If it isn't minimal, I have to have assistance or not get there. My usual tactic is to turn down the wheelchair at checkin and see how I do on the way to the gate when there is no time pressure. Leaving, I ask how long the walk will be and decide on that basis whether I need assistance or not. Sometimes, there is no question, and I have to have it when exiting the plane.

    Not saying that applies to all, but there are some whose need varies and isn't predictable in advance.
    And do you request flight attendant assistance to load your 30-lb (or more) wheeled bag into the overhead bin when you get on, then miraculously remove that tote with no problem at all at the end of the flight, then proceed to walk at a brisk pace up the jetway and through the terminal?
    “Maybe you shouldn't dress like that.”

    “This is a blouse and skirt. I don't know what you're talking about.”

    “You shouldn't wear that body.”

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Presley View Post
    Don't like the new policy. Many disabled people cannot spend more than a couple hours in the parks. If they have to go to guest services, wait in line there, to get a fast pass for each ride, I don't think they will get much out of their day.
    Then perhaps the park isn't a good choice for those, just as a beach resort in the tropics isn't a good choice for a person who is genetically disposed to skin cancer and music camp isn't a good choice for a person with tin ear such as mine.

    As I've gotten older I find it in increasingly difficult to sit through a movie at a movie theater. My solution isn't to ask the movie theater to give me a ticket that will allow me reentrance into the theater several times so that I can see the entire movie in smaller segments; rather I choose to not go to movie theaters and use movie viewing options that allow me to a view a movie in shorter segments.

    *******

    The business model for a theme park is not built on people spending a couple of hours in the park and then leaving. They don't make money on the entrance fee; that covers the base cost of operating the resort. They make money on all of the additional stuff people purchase inside the park. Theme parks want people there all day, because the more time people are at the park, the more money they spend. It makes perfect sense for them to structure their program in favor people staying in the park all day, in same way that it makes sense for a resort located on a beach to tilt their services in favor of the traveling public that prefers to stay at a beach.

    *****

    Maybe the disabled access program that makes the most sense is a form of the old system where you got lettered tickets that were good for different classes of rides. A fiixed numbers of tickets could be provided for different ride groups, with certain tickets good at certain times of day. So maybe you could access 4 "A" -group attractions during the day, segregated into separate 2-hour intervals. Similar blocks could be provided for a set of "B" attractions, "C" attractions, etc. At any time that a person wants to wait in line as an ordinary guest they could do so - so if a line is sufficiently short at an attraction they can do that attraction without burning a ticket. That way a person with disability challenges could get roughly the same attractions access as a non-disabled cohort, would be spend the amount of time in the park that the park operator desires, and not be penalized for having a pass when attractions are otherwise lightly attended.

    Such a program could even be structured with different degrees of access privileges, so that a person who is physically unable to participate in some of the most popular attractions (such as the roller coaster rides) could get a cheaper pass that omits those attractions.
    “Maybe you shouldn't dress like that.”

    “This is a blouse and skirt. I don't know what you're talking about.”

    “You shouldn't wear that body.”

  5. #15
    Nope--can't take carry-on luggage unless my husband is there to handle it. If I'm alone, it is all checked. And I never walk at a brisk pace, though I wish I could.
    "You cannot legislate the poor into prosperity by legislating the wealthy out of prosperity." Adrian Rogers

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Pstreet1 View Post
    Nope--can't take carry-on luggage unless my husband is there to handle it. If I'm alone, it is all checked. And I never walk at a brisk pace, though I wish I could.
    Please understand, I wasn't talking about you. I was referring to "disabled" people I have personally seen on flights - people who are rather obviously abusing the system, and don't really care that their abuse is obvious. And the airlines are afraid to try to call those people out because if, God forbid, they make a mistake, they are likely to get hit with a legal claim. So the abuse continues, and continues to increase.
    “Maybe you shouldn't dress like that.”

    “This is a blouse and skirt. I don't know what you're talking about.”

    “You shouldn't wear that body.”

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Presley View Post
    Don't like the new policy. Many disabled people cannot spend more than a couple hours in the parks. If they have to go to guest services, wait in line there, to get a fast pass for each ride, I don't think they will get much out of their day.
    Disney is currently testing a magic band fastpass plus system, where you request and are assigned timed passes to various attractions, including many, many attractions that were never part of the fastpass system before, up to and including things like parades and fireworks. Speculation is that Disney will keep some spaces open for disabled people to fit into that system.

    EVERYTHING is changing at WDW right now; no one knows how any of it is going to work, but going on Disney's history, they are going to try to keep the park accessible to everyone.

    Quote Originally Posted by chriskre View Post
    My yearly pass became uselesss to me because I just don't have the strength to stand for 70 minutes in line per ride.


    There are many people in the same situation, and I don't think Disney's going to leave you all in the lurch. But I know that, even with the current GAC system, it can be really hard going to Disney when you're dealing with that. My mom is not technically disabled, but she doesn't have the stamina for a day at Disney, and she's not convinced she'd have fun using a wheelchair. Disney can help with accessibility to the rides and big events, but it's still a very different experience just maneuvering within the parks, and they can't change that.
    Last edited by Hobbitess; 09-25-2013 at 09:38 AM.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by T. R. Oglodyte View Post
    Then perhaps the park isn't a good choice for those, just as a beach resort in the tropics isn't a good choice for a person who is genetically disposed to skin cancer and music camp isn't a good choice for a person with tin ear such as mine.
    This is what I was thinking!!! It's hard enough to deal with a park for an entire day, I know I won't do it as a senior citizen. People are getting accused of being unkind to the disabled, but I honestly do not understand why one would choose a very large place with crowds and Lines, there will be Lines. For the rides, for the concessions, for the bathroom, to get in, to get out ... LINES LINES LINES.

    If one is unable to wait in line, why choose a venue where Lines Are A Given?

    I am not anti-disabled, and am in favor of making accommodations for the disabled children of the world to get to go to Disney but I guess I don't understand why one would choose to go there if it is so difficult?

  9. #19
    Another thought is to give everyone a scannable park pass. That gives them to the option to create all kinds of custom plans. An unrestricted pass gets you anywhere, anytime. Other passes could be for disabled, with whatever conditions or restrictions are appropriate. There could even be different types of disabled passes for different types of disability. There could be a grandparents type of pass that gets you into the park but excludes most rides and attraction. There could be all kinds of possible customization options, limiting the number of rides that can be taken within a given time, or spacing the usage out over the day to keep people in the park. They could put together whatever packages the market will bear.
    “Maybe you shouldn't dress like that.”

    “This is a blouse and skirt. I don't know what you're talking about.”

    “You shouldn't wear that body.”

  10. #20
    Senior Member
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    I've lived driving distance to Disneyland my whole life, which has translated into many visits. Once upon a time, I could go during off season and easily get around inside the park (there was only one park) and do anything that I wanted to do without waiting more than 15 minutes for anything. It's been several years since I've had that experience. The area is overly crowded anytime that I go there.

    One thing that hasn't changed is that I always see at least one disabled person in a motorized wheel chair. I'm not talking about someone that you can't tell by looking at them that they are disabled. I mean you can see that they could not walk on their own. One thing they have all had in common was a huge smile. Disney is still a once in a lifetime dream trip for many people. I hope that this change does not change the magic for them.

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